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Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory
208 North Wright Street Urbana, Illinois 61801

 

Office hours 8:30a - 5:00p

 

Phone: 217-333-3097
Fax: 217-244-6375
email: mntl@illinois.edu

Highlights

Iwona M. Jasiuk

Iwona M. Jasiuk

Professor
Mechanical Science & Engineering
3112 Micro and Nanotechnology Lab
208 N. Wright Street
Urbana, Illinois 61801
(217) 333-9259
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Ph.D. TAM Northwestern University 1986

Research Statement:
Professor Jasiuk develops research-based models to explain the structure and behavior of man-made and biological materials. Her work with man-made materials aims at understanding why the properties of composites made with nano-sized particles differ from those made with micro-sized particles. She is particularly interested in the interface that surrounds such particles and comes into contact with the surrounding material, and how this interface contributes to the shape, size and boundary conditions of composites as a whole.
Professor Jasiuk is also studying novel high voltage and high temperature materials for energy transfer, aerospace, and other industrial applications. More specifically, she is conducting a multiscale characterization of the structure, composition and material properties (mechanical, electrical, thermal) of metal and polymer matrix composite materials and she is modeling these materials analytically and computationally.
Her work with biological materials focuses on bone. One ongoing project aims to explain the underlying mechanisms that cause osteoporotic bone to break. Using electromicroscopy, Professor Jasiuk has successfully characterized the physical structure of normal bone and osteoporotic bone at different structural scales. After finding no significant structural differences between normal and diseased bone at either scale, she has redirected her efforts to identify chemical and mechanical differences in these two bone types that might lead to the development of non-invasive techniques that can be used within a clinical setting to characterize and compare the chemical structure of normal and osteoporotic bone. This research is complemented the multiscale characterization and modeling of the structure, composition and mechanical bone as a function of age.

Two recent projects with other researchers also involved bone. Professor Jasiuk and Jo Ann Cameron, associate professor of cell and developmental biology at the Institute for Genomic Biology, used frogs as a model to study limb regeneration. Frogs make a good model, because tadpoles regenerate lost limbs on their own while mature frogs do not. Yet, if an adult frog is missing a large piece of bone, implanting a synthetic scaffold will encourage the natural bone to grow back. Professors Jasiuk and Cameron studied the chemical and mechanical stimuli that are involved in both types of regeneration and to determine what, if any, differences there are between such stimuli in young frogs versus older frogs.
Professor Jasiuk has also teamed up with John Dantzig, now an emeritus professor in the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, to study the effects of solid and fluid phases of bone on bone remodeling. Together, the two professors were investigating how bone remodeling is influenced by mechanical and biological stimuli and how these stimuli influence the properties of the resulting bone.
Research Interests:
  • Mechanics of materials
  • Micromechanics
  • Composite materials
  • Biological materials
  • Bone mechanics
  • Biomaterials
  • Elasticity
  • Fracture mechanics
  • Nanomaterials
Undergraduate Research Opportunities:
Several projects in the area of characterization and modeling of materials are available.
Graduate Research Opportunities:
I have an opening for one Ph.D. graduate student.
For more information:
Department Profile Page

Honors, Recognition, and Outstanding Achievements for Teaching:

  • UIUC List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent by their Students - Spring 2013
  • UIUC List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent by their Students – Spring 2008
  • “Most Helpful Professor,” Teaching Award, Georgia Tech, 2002

Honors, Recognition, and Outstanding Achievements for Research:

  • Worldwide Who's Who, 2012
  • Fellow, Society of Engineering Science, 2012
  • Fellow, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2003
  • Listed in Polish American Who’s Who (1st edition), 2000
  • Listed in MARQUIS Who’s Who in American Education, (5th edition), 1997
  • Listed in MARQUIS Who’s Who in Science and Engineering (2nd & 3rd editions), 1996
  • Murphy Fellowship, Northwestern University, 1982-1983
  • Chicago Intercollegiate Council Scholarship, 1983-1984

Honors, Recognition, and Outstanding Achievements for Public Service:

  • Undergraduate Committee, Departmental, 2013-2014.
  • Search committee member for Director, Health Care Engineering Systems Center & Professor - College of Engineering, 2013-2014
  • Promotion and Tenure Committee, College level, 2013-2014
  • Chair of Bylaws Committee, Society of Engineering Science, 2012
  • Member of Nominating Committee, Society of Engineering Science, 2011-2012
  • Chair of By-Laws Committee, Society of Engineering Science, 2007
  • Chair of Awards Committee, Society of Engineering Science, 2004
  • Chair of Nominating Committee, Society of Engineering Science, 2002-2003
  • Member of Board of Directors, Society of Engineering Science, 2000-2006
  • Chair, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Applied Mechanics Division Composites Committee, 2004
  • Vice-Chair, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Applied Mechanics Division Composites Committee, 2003
  • Awards committee, American Academy of Mechanics (2007-2008)
  • SES representative to the US National Committee on Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, 2007-2010
  • President, Society of Engineering Science, 2006
  • Vice-President, Society of Engineering Science (SES), 2005